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Women’s-Only Groups: Are They Archaic?

Posted by on Jan 22, 2017 in Business & Information Technology, Politics/Current Events | 0 comments

Women’s-Only Groups: Are They Archaic?

women's-only no-men sign

As we move into the most divisive era in modern times I find myself wondering: Aren’t women’s-only groups kinda retro? Even archaic?

It’s 2017. Yes, I know who’s in the White House. Forget that for a moment. No wait, don’t. Keep it in the forefront of your mind as you read this. Women are graduating from colleges and universities in greater numbers than men; more women are the main breadwinners in their household than ever before; the fact that a woman came a hair’s-breadth from entering the White House is still a far greater coup for women than the doomsayers, misogynists, and chronically-neurotic victim feminists would have you believe.

Yes, we’ve got a self-admitted sexual predator in the White House. For once, ladies, we can’t entirely blame the boyz for this one. Women supported Trump by 42%; I don’t care that 54% didn’t – 42% is still far too high. (The other 4% were too busy defending Kim Khardashian’s robbery claims on Twitter to pay attention.) It wasn’t just uneducated working poor women who supported him either; plenty of college-educated women are also to blame.

And people wonder why I’ve begun holding women more accountable (or ‘blaming the victim’ in victim feminist parlance) for tolerating bad male behaviour.

I don’t think the answer is to separate from the other half of the human race. Women have been fighting male-only enclaves for decades now; critics have pointed out, quite rightly, that women’s-only gal-caves are nevertheless still considered acceptable.

I’ve belonged to plenty of women’s-only groups and discussion forums in the past, but I find myself less inclined with each passing day. Last year I joined a women’s-only Meetup group for freelancers and entrepreneurs, not because it disallowed men but because it was the only meetup in my area for such a thing (and without charging an outrageous fee like many meetups are doing, including most Toronto-area business groups).

While it’s a great bunch of ladies with interesting ideas, I can’t help but feel it’s only half the story. Why is it only for women? Why are we blowing off half the entrepreneurs in the city, many of whom will also have some great ideas, experience, advice, networking, and help to offer?

Is it because some women still lack the confidence to hold their own with a gender not unfairly charged with dominating conversation, shutting women out or patronizing them in subtle or not-so-subtle ways?

Some men are guilty of that. Others aren’t. Maybe we need to challenge ourselves more. Slay that mansplaining dragon, St. Georgina!

I admire the fact that men are more aggressive, more risk-taking, more confident, and more willing to state their case than women have historically been. Such virtues in the extreme become faults, but that’s true for any virtue. There are still some ‘male values’ worth acquiring.

I admire the fact that women are more easily able to express their emotions, communicate better, are more sensitive to other’s feelings and are more open to compromise than men historically have been. Also virtues that, in the extreme, don’t serve anyone well either. Men have much to learn from us, too.

You can argue I’m overgeneralizing but so are women who still prefer women’s-only groups.

As the gender gap divides further with a ‘Million Women March’ to demonstrate that some of those you-know-whats are armed, Mr. President, and bitter and angry ‘Men’s Rights Activists’ on the other side, I find myself thinking we need to connect more, not less, with men. Before more of the craziness sends good, rational, level-headed men into the arms of nutty extremist groups. And because some women still need to reject the victim feminist thinking of the ‘70s and ‘80s. It’s served its purpose; as women gain more financial, educational and political power, they need to put on their big-girl pants and move on.

If the world still looks dark and threatening to women, it’s because of negativity bias and everyone falls prey to it. It’s wired into our brains, but that doesn’t mean we have to accept it. We can recognize it for what it is, name it, and focus more on what’s right in the world, and how to improve upon it.

Yes, victimizing still exists but we don’t need to give the victimizers so much power. We can still Just Say No to much of it. Just ask Madonna! (Not safe for work!)

I for one, ladies, think the Mahnolo Blahnik is now on the other foot, and that we’ve got to stop demonizing men. It’s part of the reason why Trump performed so well with male voters, and not just the rednecks. Our President may think women are only valuable for their you-know-whats but my Prime Minister is a self-described feminist.

Some of us are finding it harder and harder to wear the victim label when we’re doing better in life than many men around us.

With power comes responsibility. And that means accepting and working with men the way we’ve been urging them to do with us for fifty years now.

What do you think? Are there still valid reasons for women’s-only groups?

 

Nicole Chardenet is an American/Canadian dual citizen, freelance writer and machine language translation software flogger who knows that two steps forward and one step back is still progress. She hangs with a bunch of guys as well as chicks from her artist’s hovel in the sky in Toronto. She owns a gender binary female-named cat who used to be a guy until that fateful trip to the vet, although in her defense she didn’t do it out of hostility to his maleness, but to save her furniture from chronic malodour. (Also it would make his permanent virginity easier to live with. For him.) Outraged un-neutered males and anyone interested in her writing services can reach her at:

Nicole's contact info

From Booth Babes to LinkedIn Lovelies

Posted by on Oct 26, 2016 in Business & Information Technology | 0 comments

From Booth Babes to LinkedIn Lovelies

Enjoy the view, ladies. This is probably the only time you’ll find me posting a business-inappropriate photo on LinkedIn. You enjoy it too, boys!

(I could have selected a photo waaaaay way worse than this one, you know. A photo so hypermasculine it would have made a Marine sergeant blush. But I didn’t. You’re welcome. Or, sorry!)

From what I’ve read, men actually objectify men as much as they objectify women. This explains rather a lot about ’80s action films, in which mostly dudes went to see movies featuring sweaty, oily, muscular, badass brutes like Stallone and Schwarzenegger and Van Damme, with barely a female in sight – barely or otherwise. Bromance, indeed. Brorgy, anyone?

And on LinkedIn, more men than women seem to appreciate the photos people keep posting of beautiful, often scantily-clad women, although I’ve noticed a fair amount of men complaining about it as well.

What I notice more recently is that women are posting sexy female photos too – sometimes of themselves.

There’s no quicker way to start a flame war on LinkedIn than with a photo of a good-looking gal, if she shows enough skin. Except maybe to say anything, however neutral or non-partisan, about Tr–p or Cl—-n.

“This doesn’t belong on LinkedIn!” the battle cry goes. “It objectifies women!” “No, it’s empowering!” “Women have to fight hard enough to be taken seriously!” “I’m a woman and I approve of beautiful women.”

I wrote about this earlier in Keep Your Clothes On, LinkedIn! I was against posting provocative pictures. Now I confess that I’m beginning to question my position as LinkedIn grows and I find myself increasingly uncomfortable with not only focusing so much on how people look, but why we can’t all learn to just get along and try not to stare too much if a lady’s cleavage is showing (or your colleague’s bulging pecs) without feeding the lawyers or at least driving the HR manager into an early retirement.

It’s interesting, at least, that women seem to be posting these salacious snapshots as well. Et tu, Brenda?

Or maybe should we begin recognizing that sometimes a lack of clothes is business-related?

Why do women’s bodies provoke so many strong feelings? Why do we go as ballistic over a burkha as we do over a bikini?

Would men appreciate it if they had to log on to LinkedIn every morning and be confronted with a muscular man’s impressive package (the kind you can’t get from FedEx)? Who would complain more, women or men?

Part of me agrees that LinkedIn isn’t Facebook and there are a lot of posts I’d like to see go away – political and stupid non-business-related memes, especially badly spelled – but even there it gets fuzzy. Politics and elections affect business, but I also see a lot of non-business-related posts I love – my LinkedIn friend Mansour Rad has posted some lovely photos of Iran and Persian artwork that I often save to my hard drive because they’re so beautiful.

In the olden days, before the rise of the Internet, technology trade shows often featured ‘booth babes’ – scantily-clad hotties – to compete for the attention of the largely male attendees and draw them to the booths.

Photo courtesy of Sergey Galyonkin on Flickr

In the mid-’90s no one complained too much, but as of a few years ago I heard gripes about the few remaining booth babes. Today, we’ve got the LinkedIn Lovelies to raise a firestorm (and they will fan the flaming fuel for years, long after the next contentious President is elected).

The remnants of my old-school feminist wants to scream, “This doesn’t belong on LinkedIn!” while my French bloodline cries, “Vive la difference!”

The businesswoman in me whispers, “Nearly-naked breasts are inappropriate in a business setting,” but then she adds, “And who will be posting bikini blow-ups if she ever finds herself working for a swimsuit company?”

I do understand the confusion sown when the lines are blurred with sexy selfies and gorgeous graphics, but I also wonder if, as we move deeper into the 21st century, we can learn to look beyond the externalities, however clad, to the human beings within. Because don’t, in the end, we all objectify everyone? The person who cut you off (a jerk!), the attractive woman who draws the male gaze (wanton wench!), the manager who snapped at you (he’s an a-hole), the woman who bumped you on the street and brusquely told you to “Watch where you’re going!” (b—h!) Are these not people with problems like we all have, with insecurities we all have, who are trying to put food on the table as we all do, who live lives you don’t even think about because they’re not people to you, just annoying objects?

Remember the old ’90s movie Starship Troopers, set in the future where men and women were truly equals in the military, and even showered together with all the professionalism of a board meeting?

Do you think that can ever happen some day?

I am genuinely confused.

business-card-tag

Nicole Chardenet is a freelance writer who doesn’t intend to set the women’s movement back fifty years, but does think we should all maybe calm down a bit. She’s never been a booth babe but she does appreciate beauty in all its forms. You can reach her at nchardenet@gmail.com.

Sex Assault, Reverse Donald Trump-Style

Posted by on Oct 22, 2016 in Politics/Current Events, Sexy Stuff | 0 comments

Sex Assault, Reverse Donald Trump-Style

donald-trump-ted-cruzSo you think the exchanges between Donald Trump and Billy Bush were just ‘locker room talk’? That that’s the way a lot of men talk? I’ll bet the ‘locker room talk’ defenders would change their tune if the Trump-Bush exchange had gone down like this:

 

 

 

Donald Trump: You know and I moved on him actually. You know he was down on Palm Beach.

Unknown: He used to be great. He’s still very handsome.

Trump: I moved on him and I failed. I’ll admit it.

Trump: I did try and fuck him. He was married.

Unknown: That’s huge news.

Trump: No, no, Nathan. No this was — and I moved on him very heavily, in fact, I took him out furniture shopping. He wanted to get some furniture. I said I’ll show you where they have some nice furniture. I took him out furniture. I moved on him like a bitch, but I couldn’t get there, and he was married. Then all of a sudden I see him, he’s now got the big phony pecs and everything. He’s totally changed his look.

Bush: Sheesh, your boy’s hot as shit. In the purple.

Various: Whoa! Yes! Whoa!

Bush: Yes! The Donald has scored. Whoa, my man!

Trump: Look at you. You are a cock.

Trump: Maybe it’s a different one.

Bush: It better not be the publicist. No, it’s him. It’s —

Trump: Yeah, that’s him. With the gold. I better use some Tic Tacs just in case I start kissing him. You know I’m automatically attracted to handsome — I just start kissing them. It’s like a magnet. Just kiss. I don’t even wait. And when you’re a star they let you do it. You can do anything.

Bush: Whatever you want.

Trump: Grab them by the cock. You can do anything.

Bush: Yeah those legs, all I can see is the legs.

Trump: Oh, it looks good.

Bush: Come on, shorty.

Trump: Oh, nice legs, huh?

Bush: Oof, get out of the way, bad boy. Oh, that’s good legs. Go ahead.

Trump: It’s always good if you don’t fall out of the bus. Like Ford, Gerald Ford, remember?

Bush: Down below. Pull the handle.

Trump: Hello, how are you, hi.

Hot-Looking Man: Hi Mr. Trump. How are you?

Trump: Nice seeing you. Terrific, terrific. You know Billy Bush?

Bush: Hello, nice to see you. How you doing?

Hot-Looking Man: I’m doing very well, thank you. Are you ready to be a soap star?

Trump: We’re ready, let’s go. Make me a soap star.

Bush: How about a little hug for the Donald? He just got off the bus.

Hot-Looking Man: Would you like a little hug, hot stuff?

Trump: Absolutely. Melania said this was OK.

Bush: How about a little hug for the Bushy? I just got off the bus. Here we go. Excellent. Well you’ve got a nice co-star here.

Trump: Good. After you.

Trump: Come on, Billy, don’t be shy.

Bush: Soon as a hot man shows up he just, he takes off. This always happens.

Hot-Looking Man: I’m sorry, come here.

Bush: Let the little guy in here, come on.

Hot-Looking Man: Yeah, let the little guy in. How you feel now? Better? I should actually be in the middle.

Bush: It’s hard to walk next to a guy like this. Yeah, you get in the middle. There we go.

Trump: Good. That’s better.

Hot-Looking Man: This is much better. This is —

Trump: That’s better.

Bush: Now, if you had to choose honestly between one of us. Me or the Donald?

Trump: I don’t know, that’s tough competition.

Hot-Looking Man: That’s some pressure right there.

Bush: Seriously, you had to take one of us as a date.

Hot-Looking Man: I have to take the Fifth on that one. Yep, I’ll take both.

 

 

 

Nicole Chardenet is a freelance writer and rogue sales chick who thinks some guys wouldn’t think sexual assault is so funny if they had to live with it themselves. Obviously, she’s not talking about you because you would never do that and have too much class to talk that way. Nicole can be reached at nchardenet@gmail.com if you’d like to engage her for freelance work.

A Babel of Asian eCommerce

Posted by on Oct 19, 2016 in Business & Information Technology | 0 comments

A Babel of Asian eCommerce
asian-ecommerce-floating-restaurant

Photo by Roberto Faccenda on Flickr

Japanese may be one of the easier Asian eCommerce languages to translate – it has a considerably less challenging alphabet although there are five different writing systems to deal with – but it still poses its translation challenges. Any Asian language will, and not just because of the vastly different alphabet, more so even than European languages with unfamiliar letters or largely different alphabets.

And don’t argue!

If you’ve ever wondered why Chinese dominates the hilarious world of bad foreign translation websites and memes, it’s because Chineseis one of the most challenging languages for anyone to translate in either direction. It’s not just that the West’s languages are largely alphabetic and Asian languages like Chinese are pictographic with sometimes thousands of characters; the whole structure of cultural and historical reference, communication and thought is completely different.

Palace of explosive loin bad menu translation

Photo by lawtonjm on Flickr

Arabic is no walk in the park either, with its different alphabet, its lack of vowels in writing, unfamiliar sounds, and starting a text at what Westerners would call ‘the end’.

No appetizer for me, please…

But hey, guess where nearly a trillion and a half American dollars can come from in the eCommerce world. If you guessed “All the places where the language is least like English”, please join me in a Hai Five!

Asia’s eCommerce potential isn’t just because they’re so populous, but also because many of the countries are just beginning to get online, or adopt mobile, or are losing their wariness of eCommerce marketplaces and payment systems. You can catch the early- to mid-adopters before the waves crest.

Read more here…

 

This post originally appeared on the Yappn blog Yappn About.

Top Ten Ways To Celebrate International Translation Day!

Posted by on Oct 18, 2016 in Business & Information Technology | 0 comments

Want to have some foreign fun this Friday? Below are ten devilishly diverse ways you can celebrate the International Federation of Translators’  64th annual International Translation Day, September 30th. This year’s theme is Connecting Worlds, bringing together the world of translators and interpreters “…dedicated to one goal: Facilitating communication between people.” As the world becomes more globalized and integrated, the need to understand each other grows more critical every day.

Celebrate your international translation skills by getting massively multicultural and merrily multilingual on Friday!

1. Enroll your children in a foreign language immersion course or vow to raise your future children bilingually, even if you aren’t bilingual yourself. It’s been a trending topic for several weeks now that bilingual kids do better in life and are better prepared for a globalized world. And they may grow upsmarter than monolingual kids, too. You want your daughter or son to grow up to be CEO of a global company, right???

2. Watch a foreign family-friendly bilingual movie (with subtitles, not dubbing.) Learn five phrases from it. Amaze your friends at cocktail parties by saying, “The pink unicorn from the Land Beyond The Clouds refuses to eat his sushi,” in Japanese.

3. Visit a strange land where English isn’t the first language. Fortunately, that’s often just a short drive across town.

4. Learn how to say “My hovercraft is full of eels” with Google Translate so you don’t embarrass yourself.

 

 

This post originally appeared on the Yappn blog Yappn About. The rest of it can be found here.

Moon Over Toronto

Posted by on Oct 17, 2016 in Canada, Science/Technology | 0 comments

Moon Over Toronto

moon-over-toronto

I walked out to my balcony just a few minutes ago, fresh from my shower. The not-quite-full waning Moon over Toronto displayed the Man’s dark face. The one that people have been staring up at for generations. The one my mother first pointed out many years ago when I was a small child growing up in Orlando, Florida.

I stared up at the moon on my own, a few years later, in the middle of the day, because I knew there was something truly remarkable about it that week, even though I couldn’t see it. I knew there were men walking on that moon. I’d seen them on TV, lumbering about in their funny spacesuits, bouncing and sounding crackly on their radios. I knew this was the first time any human being had ever walked on the moon, and I think I even waved to them even though I knew they couldn’t see me.

Thank you, John F. Kennedy!

Every time I’ve looked up since, I’ve done so with the knowledge that those men left a flag planted in the lunar soil. I say that not out of a sense of pride for being an American but for being a human being – I belong to a remarkable species of primates that not long ago were still living in trees and now have walked on the moon. And left their marks. A flag, footprints, a plaque commemorating, to this day, still the most momentous thing human beings have ever accomplished.

I’ve read that India wants to go to the moon. Do it, folks, do it!!! Leave another flag up there. Right next to ours. I don’t care about nationalism or the fact that Americans won’t be any longer the only humans who’ve been there. In fact, if it’s going to piss us off that’s all the more reason to do it. We so need to get over ourselves. And maybe it’ll light a fire under our asses to accomplish something great again, just like a Russian satellite lit a fire under a progressive-thinking and perhaps a slightly Russia-obsessed president.

The Moon over Toronto – created billions of years ago when a planetary object named Thera crashed into our own planet which was covered over with fiery lava at the time, the collision resulting in our only satellite. While some claim there’s a Man on the Moon, Pagans and Witches associate it with a silvery Goddess and will assure you the Moon is feminine.

I looked up at the Moon over Toronto tonight, thinking of the small child who’s seen it with and without a flag, who used to watch rockets go up into the atmosphere while living an hour away from Cape Canaveral Kennedy, when everyone would watch it go up on TV and then race out to street to watch for the ball of glowing orange light in the sky. It’s been up there billions of years, revolving around us as we revolve around the Sun, always beautiful, never caring a whit whether we live or die. And some day our Universe will bite the big one, although scientists can’t agree how (The Big Crunch is out, maybe a Big Freeze, but at any rate the Earth will be burnt to a cinder when our Sun burns itself out in about five billion more years and expands to become a white dwarf, engulfing our planet).

Scientists are apparently quite worried about this scenario and fret about how it’s going to affect us and what we’re going to do about it and how quickly we can leave our solar system (as though this event was going to happen next year instead of so far into the future we may not even exist as a life-form anymore!)

Me, I don’t care. Que sera sera. I gaze up at the Moon over Toronto and am just glad it’s there, I’m here, the Earth is (still) here, and that someone will get up there again. It might be Elon Musk, since he has grand plans to go to Mars and we’re still light-years (ar ar) away from having the knowledge and technology to pull that off, so we/he may need to arrange for many more exploratory and experimental lunar visits before he even thinks about sending humans to Mars.

But I wish him, and Richard Branson, and the Indians, the best of luck.

50 Awesome Language Facts

Posted by on Oct 13, 2016 in Business & Information Technology | 0 comments

50 Awesome Language Facts

millennials-language-facts

What do you call the secret language between twins? Which Far Eastern language became linked to a Native American tribe, whose members turned out to be linked to them genetically? And why is the Ayapaneco language in danger of dying out in Mexico? Answer to the last: Because neither speaker is speaking to the other. The rest of the answers are on an awesome visual display created by the UIC London Language School – 50 awesome facts about language. Some facts you may already know, but there are so many cool languages – too many, unfortunately, on the endangered species list – that we promise you’ll learn something new.

It’s news to us, for example, to learn that the Bible has been translated into nearly 2,500 languages (for some languages, only parts of it). Or that Pinocchio is actually a close second. Or that some hardcore Star Trek geek spoke to his son only in Klingon for the first three years of his life, which the kid then went on to completely forget. (Young man, Gene Roddenberry is turning over in his grave right now!)

Other fun facts about language we found around the Internet:

  • You didn’t have to be a scholar on ancient Middle Eastern languages to view Mel Gibson’s The Passion of the Christ back in 2004, but it helped. The entire movie was spoken in three languages: Aramaic (Jesus’s language), Hebrew (spoken by the priests for religious purposes) and Latin spoken by the Romans. However, it did offer subtitles in many different languages. (Excuse us, Google Translate: You do not cannot currently offer Aramaic so we can ask an ancient Nazarene, “Please pass the popcorn.” Fix this!)
  • Forget Mary Poppins. The longest word in the English language is:

    volcano-300x225

    This will give you a hint of the answer. Photo by bnpositive on Flickr

Ha! The rest of the post is to be found here along with an awesome infographic. It originally appeared on Yappn’s blog Yappn About. 

Multiple Languages Critical for the Global CEO

Posted by on Oct 11, 2016 in Business & Information Technology | 0 comments

Multiple Languages Critical for the Global CEO

Why should your child learn another language? Because multiple languages are no longer just a key component in global business, they’re quickly making a huge financial success difference. Especially for the future CEO of a global company. Knowing different languages isn’t a required piece of knowledge (yet), but it is a strong advantage.

Many top global business leaders speak multiple languages. Mark Zuckerberg, Founder and CEO of Facebook, speaks Chinese along with his mother tongue. And he doesn’t just kinda sorta muddle through it either – he gives speeches and takes questions in it.

Leo Apotheker, former CEO at SAP and Hewlett Packard, is fluent in German, Dutch, French, English and Hebrew. His multi-fluency was one reason why he was chosen as CEO of Hewlett Packard. Nestle CEO Paul Bulcke, fluent in six languages, says on their website, “Being multilingual creates a strong connection with peers, employees and consumers, which is critical for a business like ours.”…

 

The rest of the post can be found here. It originally appeared on the Yappn blog Yappn About.

GLOBALIZATION VS. LOCALIZATION: The Difference

Posted by on Oct 2, 2016 in Business & Information Technology | 0 comments

GLOBALIZATION VS. LOCALIZATION: The Difference

What’s the difference between globalization and localization? The meanings seem to be as fluid and changeable as a political candidate’s campaign promises.

In relation to eCommerce software development, globalization, also sometimes called internationalization, refers to preparing one’s software platform to be adaptable to different countries and cultures without extensive re-engineering as your business expands. For example: Enabling your platform to handle non-Western-alphabetic languages, different time and date formats, currencies, sizing and measurement systems, and inoffensive images (you wouldn’t, for example, want to include photos of semi-clothed models for more conservative cultures), differing fonts and layouts, etc. Localization means customizing the user interface for each culture and market including language translation, cultural preferences, use of certain colors, preferred time and date formats, etc. North American pricing is in dollars, for example, while European pricing is in euros except for the nine countries that never adopted it. And Asian pricing comes in a wide variety of currencies.

A good example of a globalized product is the Olympics. There were over 200 countries competing in this summer’s Rio Games, withliterally half the world – 3.6 billion – watching on a variety of devices including TVs, computers, tablets and mobile phones. The Games offered translation and localization both for visitors and distant viewers. Today, Japan is preparing to localize for the influx of tourists they will get when Tokyo hosts the 2020 Summer Games. That’ll give them plenty of time to avoid the typical translation signage snafus.

beware-of-slippy-globalization

Olympics localization efforts weren’t just for Brazilians and their government; it was for any country who covered the games in the media, social or broadcast.

When you decide to sell your eCommerce products in a new foreign market, that’s globalization. When you translate it into Chinese or Malaysian and customize it for various cultural preferences and tastes, that’s localization.

Globalization example: Apple, everywhere. Localization example, Apple, failed: The European Apple II debut in the early ‘80s. While the keyboard had been properly localized for the Japanese model with allowance for Katakana, Apple failed to include accent marks and special punctuation for the Europeans not required on North American models.we-speak-your-language-globalization

Language translation is the biggest and most time-consuming piece of localization design. It’s not just literal translation but adhering to proper cultural context and post-editing to ensure anything inaccurate or inadvertently offensive has been removed. It’s also important to make sure everything on the website has been properly translated, including banners, menu items and image text.

Deciding to globalize your business doesn’t even have to cross borders, initially: You’ve got plenty of foreign language speakers right here in your own country who Google on phrases like ‘party favors and novelties’ in their own language to find eCommerce websites they can comfortably buy from. If your website is only in your own language it won’t be listed in the search results.

Localizing for your alternative language fellow neighbors is a little less challenging, where they expect pricing in your currency rather than their own, where the time zones won’t be so different, and where the design may be a little more home-culturally based. Later, when you want to take your business overseas, localizing will be less of a project, involving optimizing and tweaking.

But globalize your eCommerce platform first, so you don’t reinvent the wheel!

This post originally appeared on the Yappn blog Yappn About.

 

Yappn is a real-time innovative language services provider that not only knows the difference between globalization and localization, but also the subtle differences between Mandarin and Cantonese Chinese. Yapp with us about it further at sales@yappn.com.

Pick Your Language! The World Is Literally Next Door

Posted by on Oct 1, 2016 in Business & Information Technology | 0 comments

Pick Your Language! The World Is Literally Next Door
two-mexican-girls-with-american-flag

Photo by Cliff on Flickr

Why translate your website into another language? Because we live in a multicultural world and people are far more likely to buy from companies catering to their language. Wouldn’t you?

There’s no need to start off with a United Nations of a website – pick just one, the second language, official or unofficial, of your own country.

If you’re in the US, that would be Spanish. In Canada, that would be English or French. Or, depending on your community, maybe there’s a greater need for Chinese or Punjabi or Vietnamese. Let’s say you’re American, then Spanish is the place to start, with more than 45 million Hispanophones.

According to Pew Research Center, in the US alone:

  • 84% of Latino adults use the Internet
  • Immigrant Hispanics moving online has leaped from 51% in 2009 to 78% in 2015
  • Spanish-dominant Internet users have doubled to 74%
  • Half of American Latino users are immigrants and 32% are Spanish-dominant
  • America’s Hispanic population is one of the youngest – almost half are under 18

A recent Common Sense Advisory study found that 72.4% of online consumers were more willing to buy a product if they can do so in their own language, and over half were willing to pay a little more for it.

Opening up your eCommerce site to one more language is a good way of testing the waters for new sales. It won’t cost an arm and a leg and any mistakes you make will be on a much smaller scale than if you try to take on, say, all of Europe.

Translating your website into one language – say, Spanish – involves making sure everything is translated, not just whatever comes out of Google Translate. That includes the language in images, marketing brochures, PDFs, and menu items, all of which won’t get picked up by a common translation engine.  Then, what do you do when your website visitors have questions? Multilingual chat software is a highly affordable answer, and reduces the need for hiring multilingual chat specialists.

Want to get the word out about your spiffy new Spanish-language website? Tell the world en Espagnol on social media sites!

asian gathering

Photo by Charlie Nguyen on Flickr

Foreign language speakers aren’t just in other countries. They’re right here, living next door to us. According to the World Atlas, Spanish isn’t the only language widely spoken in the US after English. New Americans also increasingly speak Asian languages like Chinese, Korean, Vietnamese and Tagalog. Other languages also becoming common include German (Hä?) and Hebrew (Oy!).In Canada, after English and French, the most widely-spoken languages are…well, between all the aboriginal and immigrant languages, it’s a wonder Canadians can understand each other at all!

confused-face

What’d you say, eh?
Photo by Haldean Brown on Flickr

Learning how to service customers in one other language prepares you for a future of new revenue streams in an increasingly-globalized world which is literally at your doorstep.

And those newcomers need to buy stuff. Are you ready for them?

Think globally, and start locally.

 

This post originally appeared on Yappn’s blog, Yappn About.

 
Yappn is a real-time innovative language services provider offering a way better translation experience than running your website through a single translation engine. How many other languages does Yappn speak? Sixty-seven of them! But we suggest you start off with just one. Yapp with us about it further at sales@yappn.com.